Work in the Media | Deuze | Media Industries

Mark Deuze is a key academic in the area of media and labour. I haven’t read this yet but suspect it is a good pointer of the sort of precarious labour that creative professionals very much find themselves within in contemporary media industries. (This is also one of the reasons why many of our graduates end up as reasonably high level managers in production houses, government agencies and so on – there’s a guaranteed salary each week.)

Work in the Media | Deuze | Media Industries.

Symposium Questions for Week 8

  • Murphie and Potts identify some technologies as ‘neutral’ (as in reference to the gun violence debate). How does this apply to networked media and technologies?
  • Can technologies be neutral if they are developed for specific purposes?
  • If Shields is correct in saying ‘plots are for dead people’, then how do we tell stories and utilise the network/new media resources available to us today? Alternatively, how might we tell stories that are ‘alive’?

Reading 09

A continuing foray into the shapes of networks, particularly the sorts of shapes relevant to the internet. This is about power law distributions and small world networks. Which is a) why the internet has a different relation to size than the ordinary physical world, and b) why when you say something about someone else it is pretty simple for them to know about it.

“The 80/30 Rule”. Barabási, Albert-László. Linked: The New Science of Networks. Cambridge (MA): Perseus, 2002. Print. (extract, PDF)

Anderson, Chris. “The Long Tail.” Wired. N.p., Oct. 2004. Web. 23 Aug. 2013. (PDF, and Web)

Reading 08

Now we move to thinking about what sort of network the Web and Internet might be.

Watts, Duncan J. Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age. London: Vintage, 2003. Print. (Extract – PDF)

Barabási, Albert-László. Linked: The New Science of Networks. Cambridge (MA): Perseus, 2002. Print. (Extract, PDF)

Trust Networks

Quick dirty one. In reply to a recent email about ‘trust networks’:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_software#Debates_or_design_choices
where they discuss trust in a specific way in that section

complicated but a table in there is useful
http://www.hks.harvard.edu/netgov/files/png_workingpaper_series/PNG06-002_WorkingPaper_MergelLangenberg.pdf

http://www.ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/article/view/465/430
discusses trust

the readings are able to move into network stuff so some of the above material will begin to make more sense *after* we move into the next readings….

Reading 07

Apologies, I had thought these readings were online before I went to London for a conference. (Ah, they were but there was a tag problem so looks like they didn’t appear under the reading heading. So you might have found them, you might not have. Treat the Shields addition below as very useful and important….)

But they weren’t, so here they are. The first two, which are from the same book, are a poor quality PDF scan, apologies for that. The third, from Shields, is not about digital media (it’s from a book that is about what we would call ‘creative nonfiction’) but what he writes about collage and nonfiction and story is very useful in relation to the broader conversations that have been happening around story, linearity and so on. The Shield’s book has been very influential, and note that it is an essay, but not as we usually think of an essay, and is also a demonstration of how you can write critically (making an evidence based argument) outside of the very conservative form of the ‘traditional’ essay – a form that is poor for thought, and good for proving what you already know (which I would have thought is the opposite of research, and learning).

Key Readings

Murphie, Andrew, and John Potts. Culture and Technology. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Print. ‘Theoretical Frameworks’ extract (PDF)

Shields, David. Reality Hunger: A Manifesto. New York: Vintage, 2011. Print. “Collage” extract, (PDF)

Secondary Reading

Murphie, Andrew, and John Potts. Culture and Technology. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Print. ‘Introduction’ extract (PDF)

ACCC sues US video games giant Valve

ACCC sues US video games giant Valve.

Good example of how local media laws apply. So if I libel someone in Britain, and arrive in Britain, and they want to take me to court, they can, even though what I wrote I wrote in Australia and the server is in California…

In this case US company sells stuff here, and ignores Australian consumer law. As the ACCC says, sell here, local laws apply. (It isn’t really complicated. When I am in America American law applies to me, I can’t claim that in Australia it is legal so all is good.)

Temporary Interruption

I will be overseas at a conference for the next week and so it is unlikely I will be doing much here. Enjoy the semester break, do the readings, and given the sorts of questions that have been occurring in classes, blogs, and so on, I’d recommend you read:

Shields, David. Reality Hunger: A Manifesto. New York: Vintage, 2011. Print. Extract, PDF