A World of Differences

A World of Differences

This week’s reading by Lederer and Brownlow begins to chart some of the pivotal shifts in new media with discussions delving into demography, competition, consumption, geography and business models.

One of the most interesting takeaways for me from this reading, was this idea of localisation vs. globalisation. And how, despite worldwide trends and new technology showing a perceived shift towards a more global economy, locally produced content still strikes a big cord with audiences. With an Australian film industry that struggles to connect with Australian audiences, I have some hope here that Aussies will still (eventually?) find some comfort in local content despite ever increasing access to a plethora of international films and shows through streaming services.

Which brings us to another big part of this reading; consumption. Lederer and Brownlow’s focus here really delves into the analog “bundle” style offering that big radio stations, cable and record companies would offer their customers in the past, and how despite suggestions to the contrary, the bundle is not quite dead… or at least some reincarnation of it still exists. This argument follows that telecommunications companies and technology giants will have an upper hand with bundle-style offerings such as streaming across multiple devices. This line of thinking makes perfect sense when you consider big tech conglomerates such as Apple and Google paving the way in multi-platform viewing with seamless technology integration. Lederer and Brownlow also contest media corporations will fight it out for coveted space on the digital spectrum, which seems somewhat counter to future predictions that steer us towards an online model of media consumption. I’ve always kind of subscribed to the notion of the web as a level playing field, where anyone with an internet connection can be both a consumer and a creator with infinite possibilities for new business growth and business models. So to learn that we are still at the mercy of big corporations was kind of a blow. But I guess that’s also the nature of a networked society, and something to do with the “long tail”, right?

 

There was also some interesting stuff regarding demography and growth markets, but I might I have to tackle these ideas another time as I’m beginning to ramble.